Updates from The Idaho Library Association

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JULY 12 DAY OF ACTION TO SAVE NET NEUTRALITY

 
WHO: ALA is one of nearly 200 organizations participating in the July 12 Day of Action to Save Net Neutrality. The day of mobilization is part of a larger Battle for the Net effort, which is a project of Fight for the Future, Free Press Action Fund, and Demand Progress.
 
WHAT: Websites, Internet users, and online communities will come together to sound the alarm about the FCC’s attack on net neutrality. Absent strong, enforceable net neutrality rules, internet service providers (ISPs) have the financial incentive and opportunity to sell priority access to certain content providers and otherwise pick online winners and losers. Enforceable rules are essential for libraries to fulfill our missions and serve our patrons.
 
WHEN: July 12, 2017
 
WHERE: Everywhere
 
WHY: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has opened a public proceeding to roll back network neutrality protections instituted in 2015 and subsequently affirmed by court rulings. Net neutrality is the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) must enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source and without favoring or blocking specific services or websites.
 
ALA has been on the front lines of the net neutrality battle with the FCC, Congress, and the federal courts for more than a decade, working in coalition with other library and higher education organizations as well as broader coalitions of net neutrality advocates.
 
HOW: As part of its participation, ALA will make the Day of Action visible on its home page and asks ALA units, members and allies to join the effort on July 12 and beyond in several ways:
 
1)      Get the word out on social media about the Day of Action and the importance of network neutrality by using messages like these:
 
#Libraries stand for equitable access to online information for all. Protect #NetNeutrality!
 
No blocking, no throttling, no paid prioritization! #Libraries demand #NetNeutrality!
 
#NetNeutrality is essential to our democracy, freedom of expression & free speech.
Protect a free & open internet from @FCC rollback
 
Open internet is essential to free speech, economic growth & educational achievement. Protect #NetNeutrality!
 
More than 4 million people voiced support for #NetNeutrality. Tell @FCC to leave our rules alone.
 
2)      Email the FCC via ALA’s Action Alert Center: Tell the FCC to Save Net Neutrality
 
3)      Go online to find and download ALA Day of Action graphics, “Because” statements and other materials to use and share with others. PAO also has developed a Because slider and art that ALA units can use on their home pages and link to ALA resources.
 
4)      Amplify and extend the voice of ALA and libraries in the FCC’s docket of public comments. The initial comment period closes July 18, followed by a “reply” comment period in which organizations and individuals interact with other comments, as well as the FCC’s original set of questions in the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. ALA will file comments and share tools and resources for our members to affirm and add to the record of library support for protecting net neutrality rules. Get news and information as it breaks at the ALA Washington Office District Dispatch blog.
 
5)      Engage your communities in conversations about net neutrality and what the open internet means for free speech, equity for all in the digital age, learning, and innovation.
 
LIBRARIES AND NET NEUTRALITY TALKING POINTS 
Net neutrality is the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) must enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source and without favoring or blocking specific services or websites.
After a public process that generated more than 4 million comments, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved an Order in 2015 that gave Internet users the strongest net neutrality protections to date. The “bright line” rules state that ISPs cannot block traffic, degrade access, or offer to speed up some traffic for a fee.
The ALA and America’s libraries believe preserving the open internet is essential for ensuring the free flow of information to all, which underpins free speech, research and learning, economic empowerment and digital innovation.

America’s libraries collect, create and disseminate essential information to the public over the Internet. We support strong, enforceable net neutrality protections as an expression of our values, our mission, and our professional practice as broadband consumers and advocates.

 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Home page for ALA advocacy related to net neutrality
Ongoing updates on net neutrality via District Dispatch blog

New Because statements and Day of Action resources

 

Sharing Making - Mountain Home Public Library

Thank you, Shasta Bolduc, Programs & Services Coordinator at Mountain Home Public Library, for participating in the Sharing Making series!  A series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
1.5 years

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Usually once a week we do stealth programming , and leave items out to tinker with like Legos, straws & connectors, makey makey, edison robots. 

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Once a month we offer a class introduction to Tinkercad and give them a free print from what they create in class. We invite 10 people at a time for each class where we walk them through the process of creating a robot bookmark.  We have them make a head, body & legs using squares and rectangles afterwards teaching how to create holes for the eyes ending with the option of adding their own little edits to their creation.  We then save their creations which we later print out for them on our 3D printers.  We do not charge for this class including the 3D print but we let them know that anything else they’d like printed will cost .05 per gram to make.  We’ve been doing these classes once of month since winter and almost all classes have been full and participants come away wanting to learn more.

The first picture is our latest Tinkercad class after we had just purchased some Chromebooks to utilize for programming.  This was a great addition to have for the class.  Our Geared up Center had a projector so they could see what Kurt was doing while they made changes to their designs on the Chromebooks.  I was able to walk around and see all their screens and know who was having trouble and needed my help and who was right on track. 

SAM_3945.JPG

How did your "space" start?
Make it training with the Commission, getting some free 3D printers 

Who participates in making at your library?
Mostly kids, but we've had senior citizens and teens participate 

How do you market your making opportunities?
Facebook, fliers, newspaper, website 

How do you fund them?
Library budget, Idaho Library Commission for Libraries, Friends of the Library 

What’s one maker related website you find useful or inspiring?
Instructables because they give you step by step instructions so you can leave supplies out for patrons to utilize anytime 

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
https://www.instructables.com/id/LED-Bookmark-1/

During our Day of the Child celebration where we brought out Kapla Blocks, Straws & Connectors and Tangrams to do free play with, and in the Geared Up Center of the library we connected the Makey Makey sets to some laptops and let kids play Scratch games and Makey Makey activities.  We make it a point to show them how we can all connect together to create a circuit by touching fingers and they always smile after it works. 

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Our STEAM Activities take place during the school year on Tuesday afternoons.  The challenges we have posed are to see if attendees could build a structure using spaghetti and marshmallows that would hold up a toy car. Another time the challenge was to see if they could build a bridge using Kapla blocks that could bear the weight of 5 books. 

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making?

Which of those are the most popular?

What’s one piece of advice you’d share with other libraries looking to offer making opportunities?

Kids want visual examples of everything (3D prints, coloring, Legos, Circuits).

 

Thank you Shasta!
ILA Maker Committee Co-chairs, Deana & Jeff

 

Have questions or comments for Shasta? Comment on this post, and/or reach them directly at sbolduc@mountain-home.us.

 

#nationofmakers #weekofmaking 

Idaho Library Association Proposed Bylaw Changes Pass with Quorum

During the month of May 2017 the Idaho Library Association membership voted on several bylaw changes. All proposed bylaw changes passed and achieved quorum.

To view the summary and comments about the proposed changes to the bylaws, please visit this Google Drive document. 

  • The proposal to modify the Vice President and President positions into two distinct roles passed passes with 87.5% of the voting membership
  • The proposal to establish elections operated by the Secretary, Membership Chair, and Division Chairs passes with 95.8% of the voting membership
  • Creation of a new position of Content Coordinator position, separate from the Webmaster, passes with 97.9% of the voting membership
  • Wording changes passed with 100% of the vote

The current bylaws of the Idaho Library Association are now available for you to view. 

The Board will now create a working group to determine an implementation team for the transition, and we seek volunteers to help. If you want to spend a short amount of time working on a special projects, please get in touch. 

amyvecchione@gmail.com

 

Sharing Making - Salmon Public Library

Thank you, Jeff Stratter, Salmon Public Library, for participating! This is a series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that will share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
1.5 years

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?We have a Maker-Table in which we often put up passive challenges for those who walk by. They can range from Lo-tech to Hi-Tech. Some Lo-Tech would be Paper Airplane making, gathering objects from a prescribed area on the floor and having to make a rake to gather them. We had Marble Mazes, Holiday oriented challenges, and more. Hi Tech have involved Makey Makey's operation game, Little Bits wireless door bells, and wind powered energy windmill builds. We also have a LEGO wall we've added to our children's section which is a big hit and great way for the pre-K children to interact and "make".

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?
We run a STEM program on Friday's. Our school is a four day school week which opens up different non-traditional forms of education to take place. We have a fantastic High School volunteer who wandered in one day looking to help. Since then he's been presenting LEGO LEAGUE robotics, model rockets, circuit building, drones, and more. Beyond that we do have the occasional Fun With Math & Science Family night as well as other formal programming scheduled throughout the year. National Maker week, Teen Tech Week, Summer of Code, have all been programs we've done making for.

Circuits.jpg  MakeyMakey.jpg


Makerspace.jpg

How did your "space" start?
Through the Make-It Program at IFCL. We received kits that were STEM oriented required through the MOU to put programs together. This was a huge leap forward for Salmon Public Library and ushered in the Make-It era. From there we've been looking for ways to expand, improve, and offer more Making at our library.

Who participates in making at your library?
Right now we've mainly been attracting the 8-13 year old's. I'm still working on trying to lure in the older kids and young adults to our making programs which takes time and direct contact, but I feel with the addition of the Studio space we've created, it's already starting to do that.

How do you market your making opportunities?
Wow! This is the million dollar question. Our small rural town is a difficult beast to understand when it comes to marketing. One everyone has an event always here and two the age ranges are so vast here, it's hard to focus on just "one" way to promote. Therefore we take a multi tiered approach. We'll post information on our website in Blog format. We'll share information on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. We've also usually make fliers and post them around town, advertise in the local newspaper, sometimes go on the radio to promote! We also have in library giveaways such as bookmarks with info on it as well as in library signage that better informs the patron. Even after all that we often only get a small turnout, so promotion can be frustrating at times.

How do you fund them?
This can range from grant money to reaching into our personal pockets. It can also be repurposing old items for reuse or whatever we have on hand from say funding of last year's summer reading program. Nothing goes to waste as a maker because there is always a project that can be done with it. We've also funded things by including community partners that bring in their own equipment which is helpful at times.

What’s one (or two) maker related website(s) you find useful or inspiring?
Colleen Grave’s site, https://colleengraves.org/

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
STEM Action Center for resources / funding opportunities.

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making? 

Which of those are the 3 most popular?

What’s one thing you’ve learned in getting a makerspace up and going?
I'm thinking a question should have been one thing "I've learned". One thing I've learned is set expectations low. Just because you've put your heart and soul into creating the perfect Maker project, did absolutely everything you could think of to showcase it, market it, tell everyone you know about it, Nobody might show up. Don't be discouraged by turnout. This isn't a sprint, but a marathon. What Making is doing is changing culture and mindset. When you do that it requires patience, passion, and persistence. If you have this mindset you wont' be disappointed and give up trying to incorporate Making into your library. Know your end goal and readjust your approach and try again. It's the "making" of "making"!

Thank you Jeff!

ILA Maker Committee Co-chair, Deana

Have questions or comments for Jeff? Comment on this post, and/or reach him directly at salmonlibrary1@gmail.com. You can also help Salmon Public Library build a community makerspace by donating to their cause! 

 

Sharing Making - Idaho Falls Public Library

Thank you, Liza Evans, Adult and Teen Programming Specialist at Idaho Falls Public Library, for participating in the Sharing Making series!  A series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
6 years.

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?No

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Yes, in the past it's been 5 programs throughout summer reading. We have held them in the Young Adult area, with sign-ups and a few drop in teens. The first 4 years it was very much a crafty kind of program; paint, sewing, altering t-shirts, etc. Last year we had some deconstruction going on, and then used what they found in a craft project. This year we're going to have 10 programs, one every week of summer reading, and they will range from sewing & painting to deconstruction & building.

6.14.17_Makerspace_2.JPG   6.14.17_Makerspace_3.JPG   

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How did your "space" start?
Jenniffer Hentzen, our adult and teen librarian, started the bi-weekly Crafternoon program five years ago.  We made Sharpie t-shirts, decorated picture frames, made felt flowers, and book purses that first year.  We have followed that model for the last 4 years, and we have changed things a little this year. 

Who participates in making at your library?
Teens primarily. 

How do you market your making opportunities?
Flyers with their summer reading materials, posters, samples at the summer reading table, our website, Facebook page, and Instagram. 

How do you fund them?
We have it built into our budget.

What’s one (or two) maker related website(s) you find useful or inspiring?
Really, no joke, I don’t have any specific websites or blogs that I follow.  Ideas usually come from seeing what other people are doing, sometimes things pop up in my Facebook newsfeed, and I do spend way more time on Pinterest looking at ideas than I probably should. 

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
I'm excited for the Ugly Dolls we're going to make this year. We have different sewing techniques for the teens to use, as well as lots of different materials they can use.  We have a book in the Library that I found while shelving, and it had a lot of crafts made from canvas and using spray paint. They had a voodoo doll kind of thing in there, I googled for some more ideas, and found a wealth of ideas. Like this one, http://www.itsalwaysautumn.com/2013/01/28/stl-felt-monsters-to-make-with-your-kids-plus-free-mix-n-mat.html

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making?

  • Sewing

  • Paper crafts - like scrapbooking, origami, zine making

  • Legos

  • Hand tools - like hammers, screwdrivers, wrenches

  • Building activities - like Straws and Connectors, Keva planks, Magnetiles

  • Drawing/ coloring

 Which of those are the  most popular?

  • Paper crafts - like scrapbooking, origami, zine making

What’s one piece of advice you’d share with other libraries looking to offer making opportunities?
Find out what the teens want. We did a survey last year and have used that to create this year's program.

 

Thank you Liza!
ILA Maker Committee Co-chairs, Deana & Jeff

Have questions or comments for Liza Evans? Comment on this post, and/or reach them directly at levans@ifpl.org.

#weekofmaking #nationofmakers

 

Sharing Making - McCall Public Library

Thank you, Casey Bruck, Librarian at McCall Public Library, for participating in this series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
1 year

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Stealth programs pop up in the library from time to time, they are informal and unadvertised. These pop-ups usually coincide with a larger themed week ie- Teen Read Week.  

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Yes, we have a monthly makerspace event 

How did your "space" start?
It started with inspiration and desire, the space is shared so we still have to set it up and take it down every time. We share the space with all the other programs, activities, and meetings. It was my idea, and I was inspired by the Make It Program put on by ICFL. I started with low-tech makerspace programs, paper airplanes, perler beads, egg drops, marble mazes etc. Then I started throwing in more advanced programs such as wind turbines, makey makeys, toy mods, edison lego battlebots, and some 3D printing.    

Who participates in making at your library?
The public

How do you market your making opportunities?
Newspaper, email list, newsletter, website, social media, paper flyers

I generated my email list by having a voluntary sign up sheet at every program. I always get the same core group coming back this way.

How do you fund them?
Programs budget, and help from ICFL (make-it)

What’s one maker related website you find useful or inspiring?

Instructables has a great daily email

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
Sure,Once we got Legos (all freely donated by various members of the community) we were able to offer more engineering types of programs, and the allure of a giant mound of legos really brought the kids to the table! Lego bridge building, Escape from trash canyon, and lego ziplines were some of the favorites.  

Deconstruction jewelry is also a lot of fun, and the kids just love taking apart old tech to make something! Partnering with the high school and the local thrift store brought us a huge pile of old VCRS, printers, laptops, keyboards etc. for us deconstruct.  This is also a great opportunity to teach kids how to use tools, hot glue gun, and soldering irons. ( We just did this again today for SRP, and have some photos to share)   

 IMG952394.jpg  IMG952397.jpg  IMG952398.jpg 

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making?

Which of those are the 3 most popular?

  • 3D Printing/ design - 3D printers, 3D scanners, 3D design software/ apps

  • Legos

  • Hand tools - like hammers, screwdrivers, wrenches

What’s one thing you’ve learned in getting a makerspace up and going?

Do it! Contrary to popular belief, it doesn't take a big city budget. The exploration, tools, and learning through failure are truly the best lessons learned. Plus these are things that students don’t get a lot of exposure to in our schools.

Thank you Casey!
ILA Maker Committee Co-chairs, Deana & Jeff

 Have questions or comments for Casey? Comment on this post, and/or reach him directly at cbruck@mccall.id.us

#weekofmaking #nationofmakers

 

Sharing Making - East Bonner County Library District

Thank you, Morgan Gariepy , Young Adult Services Librarian at East Bonner County Library District, for participating in the Sharing Making series!  A series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

Group of children test tinfoil solar ovens outside on benches  

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
4 years

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?We provide our Make It program for children each week. It includes a variety of activities, such as electronics, robotics, circuitry, fiber arts, and other STEAM projects.

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?
We provide a monthly 3D printing workshop for adults and teens (and occasionally kids). It is hands-on learning using TinkerCAD, with a live demonstration of the printer.

We also participate in the NASA and MIT program Zero Robotics. This is a five-week intensive coding competition with middle schoolers.

Two children reading instructions and building robots.

How did your "space" start?
Our space started as - and still largely is - a weekly pop-up program in our meeting rooms. This came about when we joined the Make It at Your Library program through ICfL three and a half years ago. Children get to try out a number of making activities at the weekly program. It’s informal and self-paced.

We also offer a monthly 3D printing workshop for beginners. This is open to adults and teens.

Who participates in making at your library?
Children and adults

How do you market your making opportunities?
All of our events are posted on our events calendar, in local media, on our Facebook page, and on fliers in the library.

Child wearing cone hat and yarn beard

How do you fund them?
They are funded through our programming budgets, with many of the larger, more expensive tools coming from ICfL, Idaho STEM Action Center, and IMLS as part of the Make It program. I also received the PK12 Innovative STEM Grant from the Idaho STEM Action Center, which was used to support my Teen Tech Week program.

What maker related websites do you find useful or inspiring?

Instructables.com

Frugal Fun for Boys

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
Yes, in my Google Drive. Contact me for access, morgan@ebonnerlibrary.org.

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making?

  • 3D Printing/ design - 3D printers, 3D scanners, 3D design software/ apps

  • Microcontrollers/ computers - like MakeyMakey, Raspberry Pi, or Arduino

  • Sewing

  • Paper crafts - like scrapbooking, origami, zine making

  • Soldering

  • Legos

  • Robots

  • Circuitry based activities - like Snap Circuits or Circuit Blocks

 

Which of those are the 3 most popular?

  • 3D Printing/ design - 3D printers, 3D scanners, 3D design software/ apps

  • Robots

  • Legos

What’s one piece of advice you’d share with other libraries looking to offer making opportunities?
It doesn't have to be high tech or high cost. Even cardboard boxes and scissors count.

 

Thank you Morgan!

ILA Maker Committee Co-chairs, Deana & Jeff

 

Have questions or comments for Morgan Gariepy? Comment on this post, and/or reach them directly at morgan@ebonnerlibrary.org.

#weekofmaking #nationofmakers

Sharing Making - Community Library Network at Hayden

Welcome to the Week of MakingA yearly celebration by Nation of Makers that celebrates the innovation, ingenuity and creativity of Makers across the US.

Thank you, Nick Madsen, Youth Services Specialist at Community Library Network at Hayden, for being our FIRST participant in the Sharing Making series!  A series of posts organized by the Idaho Library Association Maker Committee that will share stories of making across the state. Learn what other libraries are offering, how they got their start, and other tips and tricks! Want to share your own story of making? Awesome! Here’s a Q&A form to get the conversation started.

3D prints of scanned busts

How long has your library been offering making opportunities?
5 years

Does your library provide informal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?Many of our informal opportunities are offered during established programs and events. Students have chances to win 3D printed models at our Teen programs. Storytime goers get to high five a robot during storytime. After-school students build marble runs out of strange cardboard packing pieces.

Does your library provide formal opportunities that involve making? If so, how often, and what do they look like?
At this time, we do not offer a dedicated making program at our library in-house. But, several of our school and community outreach events offer making opportunities. Students at a private school created stop motion movies. Students in several after-school programs created Rube Goldberg machines. This summer, our library staff will be presenting at a summer coding camp for Middle School girls through University of Idaho-Coeur d' Alene.

How did your "space" start?
Collaboration, creativity and critical thinking are large elements of the Maker movement and our library has incorporated them into programs and events for many years now. Beginning five years ago, our library had the opportunity to participate in the Idaho Commission for Libraries' Make It at the Library project. Through the training and mentoring offered by the Commission, we were able to solidify and focus our making activities and more intentionally incorporate them into programs for all ages. At this time we still do not have a dedicated space, but the concepts and activities of making are being used from storytimes all the way through our libraries’ outreaches to assisted living facilities.

Who participates in making at your library?
In addition to incorporating making into youth services programs, our adult services department is beginning to offer making opportunities as well. So, all ages.

20161222_135708.jpg     Rockets

How do you market your making opportunities?
Program specialists create promotion for their own events and are assisted by our Communication Director. Many of our youth services specialists and several of our adult program specialists have included maker activities in their programs. We promote our programs through social media, email lists, posters on local bulletin boards, and the library’s website

How do you fund them?
Grants through local organizations, state organizations and library budget.

What’s one (or two) maker related website(s) you find useful or inspiring?

Teen Librarian Toolbox, http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/
Make Magazine, http://makezine.com/
LowTech making pinterest, https://www.pinterest.com/cln4nextgen/low-tech-making/

Do you have a program idea you’d be willing to share? Links to resources?
Challenge a group, or groups, to make a mark on a piece of paper in as many steps as possible. It’s like a mini Rube Goldberg machine. Here’s a post I wrote for SPLAT about it. Provide them with a variety of materials, like paper towel tubes, tape, straws, marbles, ping pong balls, rulers, and of course paper and pen. Give them a set period of time, and have everyone share their machine at the end.  

SPLAT FAIL! Version of this

What sorts of tools and supplies do you have for making?

 

Which of those are the 3 most popular?

 

What’s one piece of advice you’d share with other libraries looking to offer making opportunities?
Making is about problem solving, teamwork, collaboration, critical thinking, mentoring and the process of learning. One temptation is to think that having the coolest stuff or the newest tech makes for the best Makerspace. I’d suggest that the best Makerspace is one that improves the lives of those that walk through the door, and that could be done simply by spending the time to show someone how to fold a paper airplane.

Thank you Nick!
ILA Maker Committee Co-chairs, Deana & Jeff

Have questions or comments for Nick? Comment on this post, and/or reach him directly at nickm@communitylibrary.net

 #weekofmaking #nationofmakers 

Idaho Academic Libraries Unconference

Registration is now open for the first academic library focused unconference in Idaho. 

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Let's Chat! Open Educational Resources (OER) & Open Access (OA)

Want to know more about Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Access (OA)? Join us for a lively discussion about the role of libraries in supporting and promoting OER and OA initiatives. 

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